Getting Real With Roses

How to Get Out of a Temp or Contract Job the Right Way

While resigning from any job can be an anxiety-inducing endeavor, leaving a temporary or contract position can be especially difficult. After all, if you're temporary worker or contractor whose future job prospects depend on positive recommendations from past supervisors, leaving before your term of employment has expired can have a significant impact on your perceived hireability in the eyes of both your staffing firm and potential employers. Nevertheless, sometimes leaving is necessary. And whether your motivation for doing so involves personal dissatisfaction with your workplace or an unexpected life event, there are some steps you can take to help ensure that your decision to leave does not negatively impact your future employment prospects.

First things first, if you found your current job through a staffing firm, such as Staffing Kansas City, contact your recruiter to inform them of your situation. The reputation of a staffing firm is tied to that of the individuals for whom it locates jobs, which means that your staffing firm should be kept in the loop concerning your decision to leave a position prior to the agreed date. Moreover, your staffing firm recruiter is likely to be a rich source of sound advice concerning how to best go about leaving your job.

How you communicate your intent to leave a job is every bit as important as your reasons for leaving, so use the occasion to demonstrate that you possess the ability to maintain a professional demeanor even when faced with a difficult decision. If you have signed a contract, review it to ascertain whether you are required to give a certain amount of notice (two weeks, 30 days, etc.). If your contract does not address this issue, a minimum of two weeks' notice is standard.

Compose a resignation letter that briefly details your reasons for leaving and includes the date upon which you intend to end your term of employment. Do not use the letter as an opportunity to air any personal or professional grievancesóremain positive and professional, and demonstrate gratitude for the opportunity to work with the company in question.

Schedule a meeting with your supervisor, and deliver the letter in person. This will give you an opportunity to elaborate on your reasons for leaving, if necessary. Most importantly, you should use this time to express to your employer your willingness to work hard to make your transition out of the workplace as smooth as possible by completing short-term projects and organizing long-term ones such that your replacement will be able to pick up where you left off.

During your final days or weeks at the job, follow through on the exit strategy you and your supervisor have designed, and project a positive attitude until you walk out the door. The impression you leave in your last days at the job will be a lasting one, so leave gracefully and professionally to help maintain your perceived hireability and ensure that your staffing firm will be eager to aid your job search in the future.

This article is brought to you by Staffing Kansas City, a full-service Kansas City employment agency that provides contract-to-hire, direct hire and temporary placement services.