Getting Real With Roses

Embracing a New Work Culture with Gratitude

The process of finding a new job can test the most resilient of personalities. After many applications filled out and resumes sent, landing an interview that leads to a new job is a triumph worth celebrating. This elation in making a new start or gaining another step in oneís personal career will not be without its own growing pains. In accepting a new job position, there will be an evitable learning curve associated with starting and finding success in a new job. At first this can be hard to understand, particularly if you quickly exchange the feelings of new-job excitement for feeling overwhelmed or mismatched for the position.

Take a Step Back

Rest assured that youíre in the position because youíre ready for a new challenge and that the hiring company recognized your skills and personality for the new job. Similar to experiencing stumbles as you reach any new milestone, a new job will have its own hurdles to climb and celebrate along the way. One of the most immediate hurdles is adjusting to a new culture. As human beings, itís normal to feel uncomfortable with change, whether thatís new people, new systems or new ways of doing things. To avoid these feelings of discomfort we look for ways to recreate and reimagine what worked in the past, sometimes even going as far as trying to convince ourselves that something unpleasant in the past maybe wasnít so bad after all. During these moments of panic, itís a good idea to take a step back and remember why you applied for a new position. If you canít recall, ask someone to remind you. Those initial desires to grow and make changes are just as real and viable today as they were when you began the job search. Donít let old messages get in the way of succeeding in a new endeavor.

Making the Adjustment to a New Work Culture

Recognize feeling overwhelmed is normal Ė Unless you possess mind reading abilities, you probably wonít know what to expect in a new position. Relax, no one expects you to process all of the new information at light speed. Breathe, take lots of notes and rest assured that as long as youíre paying attention, the stuff you need to know will start to make sense.

Drop the adjustment deadlines Ė As individuals we wonít experience things in the same way someone else does. You may find yourself fitting in quickly and learning the ropes with ease or may find yourself struggling to make sense of it all. Be patient with yourself and call on the support of new work buddies, people who can answer the questions and make each day a little more comfortable.

Show them you Ė Just as youíre adjusting to a new role, your co-workers are also adjusting to you. This is the time to be friendly, ask questions even when itís uncomfortable and make yourself a part of the environment. Remember this is a new start for you. Avoid people with negative attitudes about the workplace. Their unhappiness has nothing to do with your future success.

Create short- and long-term goals Ė During this transitory time, itís important to regularly check in with a manager to ensure you understand your goals and how to best fulfill them. Donít wait for someone to point things out to you. Be proactive and ask if there are books, trainings, or people to talk to that can help you meet your goals in the most expedient way.

This article is brought to you by Staffing Kansas City, a full-service Kansas City employment agency that provides contract-to-hire, direct hire and temporary employment placement services.